4 Tips to Help You Find an Apartment in New York City

New York City may be a city that never sleeps, but that doesn’t mean you won’t have to find a place to rest your head at some point or another. When it comes to the Big Apple, you have one thing that is working both for and against you: people. Aware of the need to house its 8.6 million residents, the city is littered with more apartments than you can imagine. But, because it’s a hotbed for activity, you’ll also face steep competition in finding an apartment. To help you find a new place to call home, here are four tips that will make finding an apartment in New York City easier.

4 Tips to Help You Find an Apartment in New York City

Set a Price Point

Deciding how much money you’re willing to spend on rent will quickly narrow down your options as far as what’s available within your price point. Just as salaries are typically higher in the city, rent costs are nothing to sneeze at. To live under a less financial strain, it’s generally recommended that no more than a third of your annual income should go toward housing. Additionally, in order to qualify for tenancy, most landlords require that your salary is at least 40 times the monthly rent. When looking at apartments, it’s also important to keep in mind that you’ll have other living costs, like utilities and renters insurance, that you’ll want to be wary of. Such costs can add up considerably, so make sure to leave enough room in your budget to account for them. To that end, you might find it more practical to have a bank account that is accessible from your smartphone so you can compare your planned expenses against your actual expenses at any point in time. Doing so will help you narrow down what’s affordable and what’s not.

4 Tips to Help You Find an Apartment in New York City

Get to Know Each Borough

Once you have a price point in mind, you can refine your search further by looking into which boroughs generally have properties with a rent within your ballpark. Apartments in Manhattan, for example, boast an average cost of $4,190 per month, with only three percent of properties costing less than $2,000. Needless to say, this might make your finances a little tight if you’re moving into the city to start your first job. Brooklyn and Queens are far cheaper in comparison, with rent costing an average of $2,881 and $2,593, respectively. This makes them a popular choice among newcomers and long-time residents alike. To get an idea of how much you can expect to pay in Manhattan and its surrounding areas, click here.

Get to Know Each Borough

Explore Your Options Online

Venture online and you’ll find a myriad of sites that can help you find an apartment in New York City. In fact, there are so many out there that it might even be overwhelming. The good news is that each site differs in some way, so you can stick with whichever one fits your needs best. Padmapper is a good example of this. With Padmapper, you can search for apartments by map, which is a handy feature if commute times are a priority to you. Naked Apartments is another site that features a useful geographical component. After specifying your preferences and price range, Naked Apartments will generate a map of areas that are best suited for your search. Another popular choice among house hunters is Craigslist. However, since anyone can post on the site, there are a number of risks involved and scams to look out for. That said, Craigslist is an incredibly common site for people to find great deals on apartments. To find the best apartments, look for listings that use friendly language and include a lot of information about the property. It’s also a good idea to be wary about how much personal information you provide and to meet landlords or existing tenants in public places during the day time.

Explore Your Options Online

Consider Any Connections You May Have

If you’re moving to the city, chances are you know your fair share about networking. If that’s the case, consider who you know. You might have a friend interested in moving, an acquaintance looking for a roommate, or you might simply “know a guy who knows a guy.” This could be a great opportunity to leverage your personal connection and see if your tenancy is a good fit. Not only could they introduce you to listings that you otherwise wouldn’t have known about, but moving in with someone could add to the safety factor and cut rent costs considerably. That said, the roommate dynamic is different from a friendship dynamic. Before you make any commitments, make sure you give adequate thought to whether or not that person (or persons) would make a good roommate.

Consider Any Connections You May Have

Once you’ve found yourself a place, contact Flat Price Moving to make your transition easier!