The Ultimate Guide to Moving in with a Partner

Before moving in with a partner, you should have an honest talk. It might seem simple enough, but communication is a key factor in successful adaptation to a new chapter in your relationship. Go over your finances, be honest about your spending habits, and any debts you might have. Talk about finding a new place to call home, and when you move in, be prepared for the process of adaptation.

Keep your expectations realistic when it comes to your cohabitation. And remember, real life is not a movie, so there will be some rough patches. Still, if you maintain good communication, potential and sometimes inevitable obstacles won’t affect the quality of your bond, while overcoming them will only strengthen your relationship.

Know the Perks of Moving in with a Partner

You made a decision to start a life together. Living with the person you are dating will give you insight into many of their habits. Some people say that cohabitation is a true test before you take the next step in a relationship.

When you start your life together for the right reasons, such as commitment to each other and love, there are plenty of perks to look forward to.

You will get to see your significant other every night. Even when you stay late at work, you’re coming home to them. Also, someone will always be there for you when you need those little things of affection, such as a cup of coffee in the morning or meds on a sick day.

Cooking will become a bonding activity, as well as grocery shopping. You will become more attentive to other people’s needs and desires because you will be sharing a space with someone you care about. Also, a good balance will be established. A reckless spender will start thinking about finances more, while the other person will let loose now and then. Finding a compromise will become something of a daily thing.

Also, sharing a house means you will stop figuring out whose turn is to stay over, and you will get to spend a lot of time together without planning it in advance. Put a movie on, order some take out, and you got yourself a low key date night.

And let’s not forget the financial benefits of sharing a house, even though this shouldn’t be the main reason behind such a potentially life-changing decision. You get to split your bills and rent, which will surely provide relief to your budget.

You will grow as a person when you start sharing space with your significant other.

You’re Going to Have the “Money Talk” Before the Move

According to relationship experts, it is perfectly normal for a couple that one person is a saver and the other is a spender. To avoid petty fights about being a Spendthrift or cheap, you should have the “money talk” before you start your cohabitation.

Begin by talking to your companion about your feelings towards money. Go through every question and concern that you might have – it is better to have the talk now than leave it for the future.

If you’re thinking about setting up a shared budget, it is smart to speak up about any reservations you may have. Maybe you or your loved one are relocating from a small town to a big city to be finally reunited. If that is the case, there might be some uneven financial contribution to your joint budget, at least until both of you have steady, well-paying jobs. Be sure that both you and your partner are fully aware and okay with that.

Experts also claim that people fight about finances later on in a relationship. To avoid that, communicate. Yes, this talk about money is not the most romantic step, but it is still a necessary one.

The First Step Is Being Honest and Not Having Financial Secrets

Moving in with your significant other will bring a whole new level of intimacy. You will discover many things about the other person that you never even thought to ask about.

To avoid any unpleasant surprises, when you are talking about the money, be honest about all of your financial secrets. Talk about credit card debt or student loans – these seem personal, but you will be sharing the costs of living, so you should know if there is anything that will affect your financial position. Be open about your own debts, show that you are willing to put your cards on the table, and your significant other will feel safe to talk about their finances as well.

One of the things you need for your first apartment together are credit scores. When you know all about each other’s finances, you won’t have any unnecessary surprises in this process.

Couples should talk about finances and avoid fights in the future.

You Have to Talk and Decide About Your Living Situation

Are you renting an apartment or one of you is moving into another’s place? Or you may decide to go a step further and buy a house together? Before you actually relocate, this is one of the essential questions you should have an answer to.

There are so many issues to talk about when it comes to housing. Think about commuting to work, and if you are on a budget, you might want to find a place in a more affordable neighborhood. Consider parking, as well. If you are relocating to another town and you choose to ship your car, you will require a place to park. Also, if you are relocating with pets, you should find a pet-friendly building.

Talk it through with your boyfriend or girlfriend. After that, create a checklist of all the requirements you are looking for in a new apartment. That will speed up the search and make it easier. To make more time for apartment hunting, consider hiring professional movers with packing services to take care of your belongings. But don’t forget to declutter before the packers arrive, and here’s how to do it right.

You’ll Have to Toss Some Things Out When Moving in with Partner

Estimate the value of household goods for insurance purposes and create an inventory list of all of your belongings, since you probably wouldn’t want to have duplicates in your new place.

If both of you have a fridge or a big TV, choose the one that you are happy with, and you can sell the other or put it in storage. Knowing how much some of the items are worth can help you decide what to keep and what to get rid of.

Do you really wish to have two coffee makers and two microwaves in your new kitchen? Probably not, but devices such as laptops, you might want to keep. Donate unwanted items – it will help you with downsizing, and you will be doing a good deed.

Before you even start, make sure that you have a checklist of tasks that need to be done:

  • Firstly, take an inventory of both flats
  • Decide together what to donate, sell or throw away
  • Measure your belongings (objects such as bed, tables, couch)
  • Take the square footage of your new place into consideration

Don’t throw away items that make your apartment uniquely yours – you might want to use them in the new flat for decoration.

Make Sure That Your New Place Feels Like Home

Change of environment might not come as easily as you think it will. To feel more like at home in a new flat, give it a personal touch. If you are the one that is relocating to another town, you will need to cope not only with the unfamiliar environment but with moving away from friends, as well. Having your new place feel like a home might help with the adjustment process.

Start small, with some personal items, and remember that since both you and your significant other should be happy with the new place, you need to be on the same page. Talk about decorating the dining room, bedroom, and kitchen together. After all, you will both use them.

If you have a space for yourself, decorate it and use it however you want. You can find a way to move a heavy desk and fill it with books, picture frames, and electronic devices you use. Add some plants, a big comfy chair, and a rug to give it a personal touch. Whatever makes you feel like home, you can add to your corner. But don’t forget, if you have your own space, your significant other should have it as well.

Finding a new place goes much smoother when couples have a checklist.

You Should Be Realistic About Your Expectations

When you share a house with somebody, you get to peek behind the curtains, see them in a way you’ve never seen them before. You will get to learn, in detail, all about your loved one’s habits, whether she or he is a morning person or a night owl, and whether she or he likes to have meaningless late-night conversations.

You will have your rough patches. Many statistics show that couples today argue a lot about social media. To avoid that, keep an open mind, talk, and you will avoid so many problems that stem from a lack of communication.

You should be realistic about your expectations when going forward with your significant other. Know that there will be times when your relationship won’t exactly be smooth-sailing. You might even struggle to cohabitate, but don’t worry, in time, you will learn how to handle living together.

You’ll Learn How to Handle Living Together

Is this your first time moving in with a partner? If it is, don’t get freaked out, give yourself a chance to learn how to live together.

You will clash, you will fight, but as long as you keep an open mind and communicate, you won’t have unsolvable problems. Remember, small favors go a long way. When you notice that your loved one is feeling blue, offer them a shoulder to cry on, or if they had a long day at work, open a bottle of wine, and have a relaxing night in front of the TV. Moments that you spend together will always be precious.

Cohabitating with significant other means you will always have a partner in crime, somebody to go on adventures with and try new things. If you packed your bike, you can spend a free Sunday biking around or put on some fancy clothes and dine out.

Having an honest and open relationship means that whenever you feel the need to have a day for yourself, you can tell that to your significant other, and indulge in some “me time.”

There Will Come a Time When You Will Need a Day Just for Yourself

When relocating for a relationship, you shouldn’t give up on moments that are reserved only for you. Being with somebody doesn’t mean that you’re not allowed to have fun without them. Would you really want to be one of those couples that skip on doing stuff that they like just because the other doesn’t? Keeping your individuality is healthy, and let’s face it, you probably won’t like all the stuff the other person does.

Maybe you want to see a new superhero movie, but your significant other just isn’t into that kind of stuff. Feel free to go to the movies alone, or with friends. Or if you want to spend a day in a spa, soaked in mud – go ahead and do it. Your other half will understand it, they probably have some things that they want to do on their own, too.

Life is not a movie set, but it can be just exciting

Finding Your Footing Will Take Time, but It Will Be Rewarding

Moving in with a partner is not like the movies and TV shows make it up to be. You will not dance around the kitchen every night, or have constant fights about socks and dishes. Yes, some of those things might happen occasionally, but most of the time, sharing a space with the person you love will bring you peace and quiet. You will get to relax and enjoy the company of somebody who knows you well.

Yes, it might take a while to find your footing, to get used to living together, but when you do, you will see how rewarding it can be.